Water Law Institute

  1. ALEX RITCHIE

    Executive Director Rocky Mountain Mineral Law Foundation, Westminster, CO
  2. WENDY BOWDEN CROWTHER

    Partner Parsons Behle & Latimer, Salt Lake City, UT
  3. CRAIG WILSON

    Managing Partner K&L Gates, Harrisburg, PA

Introduction and Opening Remarks

  1. BURKE GRIGGS

    Associate Professor of Law Washburn University School of Law, Topeka, KS
  2. BARBARA COSENS

    Professor of Law University of Idaho College of Law, Moscow, ID
  3. MARIA O’BRIEN

    Shareholder Modrall Sperling, Albuquerque, NM

Interjurisdictional Water

Disputes often arise when sovereigns – countries, states, or tribal nations– must share water resources. This presentation examines these disputes and the legal means for resolving them, focusing primarily on negotiated agreements for the allocation and management of interjurisdictional waters. Topics include:

  • Interstate waters and issues relating to compacts
  • Tribal water interests and approaches to settlement
  • International treaties and related negotiations

Break

  1. PAUL REIG

    Former Director Aqueduct Water Risk Atlas and Corporate Water Stewardship, World Resources Institute, Washington DC

Global Water Stress

Data released by the World Resources Institute in 2019 ranks countries by the likelihood that they will drain their annual water stores in a typical year. About a quarter of the world’s population live within 17 nations ranked as “extremely stressed” in this analysis, meaning that in a “typical” year, these countries use most of the water they have. The humanitarian and economic implications of global water stress are great. This presentation will consider water as a business and financial risk.

Lunch Break

  1. Robin Kundis Craig

    James I. Farr Presidential Endowed Professor of Law S.J. Quinney College of Law, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT
  2. DAVE OWEN

    Professor of Law, UC Hastings College of Law UC Hastings College of Law, San Francisco, CA
  3. KIM SAGER-FRADKIN

    Wildlife Biologist Lower Elwha Klallam Tribe, Port Angeles, WA

Dam Removal and Fish Recovery: What We Are Learning

In 2018, 82 dams were removed across the U.S. Dams have been removed in states as diverse as Alaska, California, and Maine, as well as Maryland, Michigan, Oregon, and Washington. Dam removal is important to both river restoration and, often, tribal culture and legal rights. When dams come out, fish (some of them endangered species) come back – often faster than expected – revitalizing aquatic ecosystems and tribal cultures alike. This presentation will discuss the law and policy of dam removal and the species,ecosystem, and tribal improvements that are occurring as a result.

Break

  1. ALICE E. WALKER

    Managing Partner Meyer, Walker, Condon & Walker, P.C., Boulder, CO
  2. HILARY C. TOMPKINS

    Partner Hogan Lovells, Washington, DC

Tribal Water and How It Looks in the Future

As Indian Tribes adjudicate and firm up their Winters water rights in the West, the value of those rights is apparent to those looking for additional supplies in dry years and to those involved in drought planning. As the West faces climate change, how tribal water sources may be part of drought resilience is a topic playing out in several watersheds. This presentation will explore how tribal water rights have been in play, and what the future may bring.

Course Adjournment